Law + tech news round-up

So 2016 … it’s been some time between posts.  Since my last round-up,  we’ve had the first #siteblock judgment; the appointment of a new eSafety Commissioner, the Productivity Commission released its report on Intellectual Property Arrangements, and the government is consulting on whether telecommunications data should be accessible for civil litigation. Further afield, the UK passed what has been described as “most invasive surveillance law in democratic history” and the European Court of Justice held that EU member states may not impose a general obligation to retain data on providers of electronic communications services.

That’s just some of the (relatively) recent law + tech news.  Happy reading …

Law + tech news round-up

Last week, the Attorney-General introduced the telecommunications sector security reform Bill into Parliament. Freedom House has released its annual ‘Freedom on the Net’ report. In Victoria, the government has announced an inquiry into suppression orders placed on court proceedings. And University of Melbourne researchers write that testing the strength of methods used to protect privacy in open data should not be a crime.  That’s just some of the (relatively) recent law + tech news.  Happy reading …

Law + tech news round-up

The Senate inquiry into the 2016 Census is hearing evidence today.  (You can watch or listen online.)  On the copyright front, one of the #siteblock cases is scheduled to be back in the Federal Court today. In privacy news, last week the Federal Government introduced the long awaited mandatory data breach notification bill. And for those in Melbourne tomorrow, there is a free panel: “Big Data and Cybersecurity: Are We Ready?  Happy reading …

Law + tech news round-up

It’s been a few weeks between posts … this week,  the Attorney-General announced he would introduce a Bill to amend the Privacy Act to “further protect de-identified data.”  You can read some of the reaction to this proposal below.

In the US, Dan Goodin argued that the silencing of KrebsOnSecurity opened a troubling chapter for the ‘Net.  Facebook backed down on its decision to censor posts featuring Nick Ut’s 1972 photo “The Terror of War” and Twitter has been asked to block accounts of Turkish journalists.  Happy reading …